hochhaus_home

Providing affordable housing





Hochhaus_logo

Providing affordable housing by building low-cost homes

This year, we are presenting “normal” building projects with surprisingly modest construction costs and will investigate the issue of what construction should or must cost in the first place. Alongside a number of projects that have been carried out, we will also consider ideas and unrealised planned projects and will take a look at how other parts of the world manage to provide housing and to survive – under conditions that are often a lot more precarious than we can imagine.

The example of “Grundbau und Siedler (approximate translation: Basic Structure plus Residents)”, which was presented in late 2017, covers the spectrum between an experiment with involving residents who are given the opportunity to reduce costs by means of self-help, through to the low-cost “conventional” construction of homes.

This experiment in self-construction – “Grundbau und Siedler” (Hamburg, 2013) by the BeL Society for Architecture from Cologne – will allow users to gradually develop their building in accordance with their life situations and needs. The application of the principle of self-construction in combination with professional guidance helps to achieve significant cost savings that turn the building into a Smart Price building.

The “Grundbau und Siedler” approach operates in two phases. In the first step, the basic structure is built: load-supporting elements (floors, supports), the basic services and installations (utility connections, vertical supply and disposal chutes), the stairwell and lift, and the storage and workshop rooms on the ground floor. In the second step, for which there is no pre-defined timescale, the residents can furnish and equip the interiors of their apartment units themselves. The basic structure places barely any constraints on the residents, meaning that they can chose the room layout that best suits them in a very flexible manner. According to BeL, the self-construction approach can achieve savings of up to 25% on construction costs.

A range of floor plans are presented here. Alongside the historical development of apartment layouts and sizes, the various possibilities are highlighted too and, in this way, are transferred into the somewhat abstract world of floor plan drawings. A hand-held device is available that focuses on floor plans and provides a starting point for a consideration of the issue of: “How do we wish to live?” The primary concern here is the space that we need and are able to afford. Which layouts are desirable for what phases of life, and how flexible should these layouts be? At the present time, working and living are becoming intermingled, life patterns are changing, social structures are breaking down, and isolation is increasingly a feature of urban environments. In these regards too, architecture can be of assistance by striving to achieve open structures and forms of living by means of joint action, for example.

Atelier Kempe shows that conventional construction is very much possible at costs of around 1,000 euros per square metre.

The architect Kempe Thill appears to have achieved something in the Moerwijk district of The Hague that seems almost unthinkable in Germany: a low-cost building in an urban area where the residents feel very much at home.

Thill designed a block with one-storey 95 square metre apartments fronted by a modern aluminium-glass facade. To introduce some variation into the structure and to attract a diverse set of tenants, a number of three-storey maisonette apartments were added that have an open-plan kitchen and living area and three bedrooms. Everything was based on a uniform module with a width of 7.20 metres.

All 88 apartments have underfloor heating and are ventilated and air-conditioned using heat recovery. The building meets the low-energy standard. It is heated using geothermal energy and has a thermal storage system in the ground. Greater consideration has been given to energy generation and storage, and less to providing a thick layer of insulation.

As everything is based on the same standard – even the positions of the sinks in each apartment are the same – it was possible to reduce the construction costs to an impressively low figure: 1,100 euros per square metre.

In addition, a number of examples from the 1990s show how sophisticated architecture can still be built even at low costs. A study carried out in 2007 on behalf of municipal authorities in Austria identified many new-build housing projects that were achieved at cost levels that appear almost unrealistic in comparison with today’s price levels.

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bruns10 bruns9 bruns8 Fotos: Thomas Buns

hochhaus_home





Hochhaus_logo

Providing affordable housing by building low-cost homes

This year, we are presenting “normal” building projects with surprisingly modest construction costs and will investigate the issue of what construction should or must cost in the first place. Alongside a number of projects that have been carried out, we will also consider ideas and unrealised planned projects and will take a look at how other parts of the world manage to provide housing and to survive – under conditions that are often a lot more precarious than we can imagine.

The example of “Grundbau und Siedler (approximate translation: Basic Structure plus Residents)”, which was presented in late 2017, covers the spectrum between an experiment with involving residents who are given the opportunity to reduce costs by means of self-help, through to the low-cost “conventional” construction of homes.

This experiment in self-construction – “Grundbau und Siedler” (Hamburg, 2013) by the BeL Society for Architecture from Cologne – will allow users to gradually develop their building in accordance with their life situations and needs. The application of the principle of self-construction in combination with professional guidance helps to achieve significant cost savings that turn the building into a Smart Price building.

The “Grundbau und Siedler” approach operates in two phases. In the first step, the basic structure is built: load-supporting elements (floors, supports), the basic services and installations (utility connections, vertical supply and disposal chutes), the stairwell and lift, and the storage and workshop rooms on the ground floor. In the second step, for which there is no pre-defined timescale, the residents can furnish and equip the interiors of their apartment units themselves. The basic structure places barely any constraints on the residents, meaning that they can chose the room layout that best suits them in a very flexible manner. According to BeL, the self-construction approach can achieve savings of up to 25% on construction costs.

A range of floor plans are presented here. Alongside the historical development of apartment layouts and sizes, the various possibilities are highlighted too and, in this way, are transferred into the somewhat abstract world of floor plan drawings. A hand-held device is available that focuses on floor plans and provides a starting point for a consideration of the issue of: “How do we wish to live?” The primary concern here is the space that we need and are able to afford. Which layouts are desirable for what phases of life, and how flexible should these layouts be? At the present time, working and living are becoming intermingled, life patterns are changing, social structures are breaking down, and isolation is increasingly a feature of urban environments. In these regards too, architecture can be of assistance by striving to achieve open structures and forms of living by means of joint action, for example.

Atelier Kempe shows that conventional construction is very much possible at costs of around 1,000 euros per square metre.

The architect Kempe Thill appears to have achieved something in the Moerwijk district of The Hague that seems almost unthinkable in Germany: a low-cost building in an urban area where the residents feel very much at home.

Thill designed a block with one-storey 95 square metre apartments fronted by a modern aluminium-glass facade. To introduce some variation into the structure and to attract a diverse set of tenants, a number of three-storey maisonette apartments were added that have an open-plan kitchen and living area and three bedrooms. Everything was based on a uniform module with a width of 7.20 metres.

All 88 apartments have underfloor heating and are ventilated and air-conditioned using heat recovery. The building meets the low-energy standard. It is heated using geothermal energy and has a thermal storage system in the ground. Greater consideration has been given to energy generation and storage, and less to providing a thick layer of insulation.

As everything is based on the same standard – even the positions of the sinks in each apartment are the same – it was possible to reduce the construction costs to an impressively low figure: 1,100 euros per square metre.

In addition, a number of examples from the 1990s show how sophisticated architecture can still be built even at low costs. A study carried out in 2007 on behalf of municipal authorities in Austria identified many new-build housing projects that were achieved at cost levels that appear almost unrealistic in comparison with today’s price levels.

hochhaus_home

Affordable living





Hochhaus_logo

Bezahlbares Wohnen durch kostengünstigen Wohnungsbau

In diesem Jahr zeigen wir „normale“ Bauprojekte zu überraschend moderaten Kosten und werden der Frage nachgehen, was das Bauen denn überhaupt kosten muss und soll. Neben einigen realisierten Projekten werden wir uns mit Ideen und unrealisierten Entwürfen beschäftigen und unseren Blick schweifen lassen um zu schauen, wie es in anderen Weltregionen gelingt, zu wohnen und zu überleben – unter Bedingungen, die meist viel prekärer sind als wir es uns vorstellen können.

Das bereits Ende 2017 gezeigte Beispiel „Grundbau und Siedler“ bildet die Klammer vom Experiment einer Einbindung der Bewohner, denen die Möglichkeit der Kostenreduktion durch Selbsthilfe gegeben wird, hin zum kostengünstigen „konventionellen” Wohnungsbau.

Bei diesem Experiment des Selbstbaus, „Grundbau und Siedler“ (Hamburg, 2013) von BeL Sozietät für Architektur aus Köln, wird es den Nutzern ermöglicht, das Gebäude schrittweise, je nach Lebenslage und Bedürfnissen, auszubauen. Durch die Anwendung des Prinzips des Selbstbaus lassen sich in Verbindung mit fachmännischer Anleitung erhebliche Kosten einsparen, die das Gebäude zu einem Smart Price Gebäude werden lassen.

Dabei wird „Grundbau und Siedler“ in zwei Abschnitten realisiert. Im ersten wird der Grundbau hergestellt: Tragende Elemente (Decken, Stützen), die übergeordneten technischen Installationen (Hausanschlüsse, vertikale Ver- und Entsorgungsschächte), Treppenhaus und Aufzug sowie die Abstell- und Arbeitsräume im Erdgeschoss. In einem weiteren, zeitlich nicht festgelegten Abschnitt können die Siedler den Innenausbau ihrer Wohneinheit selbst durchführen. Dabei bietet der Grundbau kaum Beschränkungen für den Siedler, so dass dieser den Grundriss nach eigenen Anforderungen in größter Flexibilität durchführen kann. Durch die Umsetzung in Selbstbauweise lassen sich nach BeL Sozietät für Architektur bis zu einem Viertel der Baukosten einsparen.

Gezeigt wird eine Reihe von Grundrissen. Nicht nur historische Entwicklungen der Wohnungszuschnitte und -größen, sondern vor allem verschiedene Möglichkeiten werden aufgezeigt und so in die etwas abstrakte Welt der Grundrisszeichnungen eingeführt. Es steht ein Handapparat bereit, der einen Schwerpunkt auf Grundrisse legt, um einen Anfang zu setzen, sich mit der Frage zu beschäftigen: „Wie wollen wir wohnen?“. Hier geht es vor allem um den Platz, den wir brauchen und bezahlen können. Welche Zuschnitte wären für welche Lebensphasen wünschenswert, wie flexibel sollen sie sein? Arbeiten und Leben wächst zusammen, Lebensentwürfe verändern sich, soziale Strukturen zerfallen, Vereinsamung nimmt gerade im städtischen Raum zu. Auch hier kann Architektur zum Beispiel durch offene Strukturen und Wohnformen, durch gemeinschaftliches Handeln helfen.

Dass konventionelles Bauen für einen Preis um 1000 Euro/qm heute durchaus möglich ist, zeigt das Atelier Kempe.

Dem Architekten Kempe Thill scheint im Den Haager Stadtteil Moerwijk etwas gelungen zu sein, was in Deutschland fast undenkbar scheint: ein kostengünstiger Bau in einem Ballungsgebiet, in dem sich die Menschen wohlfühlen.

Thill entwarf einen Riegel mit eingeschossigen 95-Quadratmeter-Wohnungen hinter einer modernen Aluminium-Glasfassade. Um die Struktur aufzulockern und auch unterschiedliche Mieter anzuziehen, kamen einige dreigeschossige Maisonettewohnungen hinzu, mit offener Küche, Wohnbereich und drei Schlafzimmern. Alles beruht auf der Grundlage eines einheitlichen Wohnmoduls von 7,20 Meter Breite.

Alle 88 Apartments haben Fußbodenheizung und werden mit Wärmerückgewinnung be- und entlüftet. Das Gebäude entspricht dem Niedrigenergiestandard. Es wird mit Geothermie beheizt und hat einen Wärmespeicher im Boden. Man hat also stärker auf die Energieerzeugung und -speicherung gesetzt und weniger auf eine dicke Dämmschicht.

Da alles dem gleichen Standard entspricht – selbst die Position der Waschbecken ist in jeder Wohnung gleich – konnten die Baukosten auf einen beeindruckenden Wert gesenkt werden: 1100 Euro pro Quadratmeter wurden ausgegeben.

Desweitern werden durch einige Beispiele aus den 1990er Jahren gezeigt, wie mit geringen Kosten anspruchsvolle Architektur realisiert werden kann. In einer Studie von 2007, die im Auftrag der österreichischen Magistratsverwaltung angefertigt wurde, sind eine Vielzahl an Wohnungsbauten verzeichnet, die im Vergleich zu heute zu fast unrealistisch anmutend geringen Kosten realisiert wurden.

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